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I can't see your face in my mind


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#1 maniclion

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 11:32 PM

Why does it sound like he say's

Insanity's Hearth Adorns the Sky? He even seems to drag the -th out.

Yet everywhere it's written Insanity's Horse?

In my ear I think Insanity's Hearth sounds far more poetically superior.

As if Insanity is a raging inferno in the sky of Jim's mind.

#2 joekidd

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 01:48 AM

I think that "horse" makes sense in light of the fact that he also cites "carnival dogs." Obviously, Mr. Morrison was working with animal imagery on that piece.

#3 blackcat

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 04:35 AM

Prob because (If you`ve noticed )Jim has somewhat of a Southern accent.
when he sings certain words..Like "Girl" for an example.

#4 maniclion

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 10:23 PM

After another more critical analysis I conclude that he says 'hearth', he almost say's:
Insanity's Heart and then adds a -th

#5 wskybar

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 10:48 PM

I don't usually make fun of posters. In fact, I usually stick up for them when others make fun of them.

But, you guys are getting ridiculous with your song lyrics. What the hell does "hearth" even mean?

And, as I've said before, ONCE you hear a song the wrong way, it's hard to here it the right way.

There are so many examples in music: wrapped up like a douche, from BLINDED BY THE LIGHT (revved up like a duece, which is a car).

If you want to do a little test, do this. Take somebody that DOES NOT know that song by the Doors. Play it for them, and say, "the first word he says here is "insanity"...tell me the second word." And see what they say.

Or, tell them that it is INSANITYS HORSE........and then, after you tell them, let them hear it. Then tell them, "do you think it's 'insanitys hearth'." They will think you're insane!!!!!!!

#6 maniclion

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 11:31 PM

Sorry I didn't want to stoke a fire in the comfortable "hearth" of your familiarity. I was just trying to change the way a particular lyric was perceived. I mean a horse is a horse of course, but if the word is hearth it gives the whole line a new poetic dynamic. I have a writing technique where I listen to music at a barely audible level I can hear the music but not the lyrics fully. I let my imagination fill the imperceptible bits.

#7 Hamlet

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 11:59 PM

It could be Jim is referring to a statue of a horse.

Looking up from the pavement it adorns the sky.

Or perhaps a painting.
we´s just joy-ridin´

#8 letsstealtheeye

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Posted 30 October 2005 - 12:30 AM

I think Insanity's horse is an image from old literature or art that Jim used, like Ship of Fools, or the four virtues. It is an image from some etching or drawing.

I like the image of carnival dogs consuming the lines..... It's like there is a circus ride, and the animals are moving in slow circles (life as a circus?) and this is wiping out the memory of someone over time while they are separated...? I think it is a neat image and this is one of The Doors most haunting songs for me.....
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#9 cdilkes

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Posted 30 October 2005 - 08:29 AM

[quote]I don't usually make fun of posters. In fact, I usually stick up for them when others make fun of them.

But, you guys are getting ridiculous with your song lyrics. What the hell does "hearth" even mean?

And, as I've said before, ONCE you hear a song the wrong way, it's hard to here it the right way.

There are so many examples in music: wrapped up like a douche, from BLINDED BY THE LIGHT (revved up like a duece, which is a car).

If you want to do a little test, do this. Take somebody that DOES NOT know that song by the Doors. Play it for them, and say, "the first word he says here is "insanity"...tell me the second word." And see what they say.

Or, tell them that it is INSANITYS HORSE........and then, after you tell them, let them hear it. Then tell them, "do you think it's 'insanitys hearth'." They will think you're insane!!!!!!!
[/quot

100% agree...change the perception of something subjective or open to interpretation.

#10 FreedomMan

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 09:23 AM

... I always understood HORSE being a synonym for HEROIN ... ????

And (being not native from an english speaking country), I sometime wonder if Jim couldn't have meant HORUS, the egyptian god of the sky, son of ISIS and OSIRIS, being symbolized by a falcon and sometimes identified with the sun. I don't know how the name HORUS is correctly spelled in (american) english, but the context would make sense to me. And it seems to connect to other DOORS lyrics, e.g the oedipus section of THE END: HORUS overwhelmed the KILLER OF HIS FATHER. And if you look to the first post-Morrison-Doors-song, you'll find the title IN THE EYE OF THE SUN - that is what HORUS is symbolized as. You may also find relations in Ray Manzarek's THE GOLDEN SCARAB.

And isn't the SUN in some way a HEARTH at the SKY, and even sometimes kind of INSANITY'S SOURCE?

It often seems to me as if Jim Morrison intentionally spelled words in a strange way so that you could understand them differently, but the different meanings all uniting to a new and very illuminating interpretation. This is, for me, one exppression of Jim Morrison's genius!

#11 joekidd

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 12:42 PM

As far as anyone knows, Jim Morrison did not use heroin in 1967 and was adamantly opposed to the drug (at least during the 1960s).

On some level, the "Lizard King" had an interest in horses as well as reptiles, as we see in Horse Latitudes. Also consider his use of the dog in both I Can't See Your Face in My Mind and Hello, I Love You.

#12 smokeythebear

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 12:56 PM

Is this song really that hard to understand without bringing in egyptian gods and changing the lyrics. Its about not being able to picture your girlfriends face in your mind. It feels like going insane (insanitys horse adorns the sky) everytime he tries to make a picture of her she dissapears (carnival dogs consume the lines). I dont get the problem with understanding this song i think it pretty obvious.

#13 joekidd

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 01:15 PM

To me, I Can't See Your Face in My Mind is about ominous melancholy and a haunting loss of memory, the poignant disappearance of the past.

#14 King Morrison

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 01:23 PM

for me it is just song rolleyes.gif

#15 letsstealtheeye

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 05:04 PM

QUOTE(FreedomMan @ Nov 2 2005, 12:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE
... I always understood HORSE being a synonym for HEROIN ... ????

And (being not native from an english speaking country), I sometime wonder if Jim couldn't have meant HORUS, the egyptian god of the sky, son of ISIS and OSIRIS, being symbolized by a falcon and sometimes identified with the sun. I don't know how the name HORUS is correctly spelled in (american) english, but the context would make sense to me. And it seems to connect to other DOORS lyrics, e.g the oedipus section of THE END: HORUS overwhelmed the KILLER OF HIS FATHER. And if you look to the first post-Morrison-Doors-song, you'll find the title IN THE EYE OF THE SUN - that is what HORUS is symbolized as. You may also find relations in Ray Manzarek's THE GOLDEN SCARAB.

And isn't the SUN in some way a HEARTH at the SKY, and even sometimes kind of INSANITY'S SOURCE?

It often seems to me as if Jim Morrison intentionally spelled words in a strange way so that you could understand them differently, but the different meanings all uniting to a new and very illuminating interpretation. This is, for me, one exppression of Jim Morrison's genius!
[/b]


fascinating. why didn't I think of that, great post! :cheers:
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#16 joekidd

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 05:50 PM

I must say that I've always heard "this morning" from Roadhouse Blues' "Well, I woke up this morning, I got myself a beer," as "in mourning." And I must say that it works either way, so perhaps Mr. Morrison was purposely injecting some ambiguity into his fatalism.

#17 maniclion

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 01:12 AM

Ain't that the way some see black, some see white, and others see infinite shades of gray clouds from which rainbows sprout.

#18 FreedomMan

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 09:36 AM

QUOTE(letsstealtheeye @ Nov 2 2005, 06:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
[quote]
QUOTE(FreedomMan @ Nov 2 2005, 12:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/quote][quote]
... I always understood HORSE being a synonym for HEROIN ... ????

And (being not native from an english speaking country), I sometime wonder if Jim couldn't have meant HORUS, the egyptian god of the sky, son of ISIS and OSIRIS, being symbolized by a falcon and sometimes identified with the sun. I don't know how the name HORUS is correctly spelled in (american) english, but the context would make sense to me. And it seems to connect to other DOORS lyrics, e.g the oedipus section of THE END: HORUS overwhelmed the KILLER OF HIS FATHER. And if you look to the first post-Morrison-Doors-song, you'll find the title IN THE EYE OF THE SUN - that is what HORUS is symbolized as. You may also find relations in Ray Manzarek's THE GOLDEN SCARAB.

And isn't the SUN in some way a HEARTH at the SKY, and even sometimes kind of INSANITY'S SOURCE?

It often seems to me as if Jim Morrison intentionally spelled words in a strange way so that you could understand them differently, but the different meanings all uniting to a new and very illuminating interpretation. This is, for me, one exppression of Jim Morrison's genius!
[/b][/quote]

fascinating. why didn't I think of that, great post! :cheers:
[/b][/quote]

Thank you!
:cheers:

QUOTE(joekidd @ Nov 2 2005, 06:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
[quote]
I must say that I've always heard "this morning" from Roadhouse Blues' "Well, I woke up this morning, I got myself a beer," as "in mourning." And I must say that it works either way, so perhaps Mr. Morrison was purposely injecting some ambiguity into his fatalism.
[/b][/quote]

Great! As far as I know, Jim Morrison did always vote against a Doors songbook. And Ray Manzarek clearly called on us "Listen to Jim's words". Maybe the deeper meanings of Doors lyrics can only be recognized by listening and getting the points when meanings become ambiguous. :shades:

#19 GaragePoet2001

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 12:16 AM

"I Can't See Your Face In My Mind" happened to play on my MP3 player today, and having this thread in mind, I carefully listened to Jim's annunciation on "insanity's horse," and I have to say, I don't think there's any mistaking the fact that he does say "horse" .... of course, he may be using a double entendre, like "insanity's whores." Hmmm... now I am confused.

And about the songbook, I think it was during the Isle Of Wight interview when the interviewer pointed out the fact that someone had published a book containing all of the Doors' lyrics in it, and asked whether or not that bothered Jim, to which Jim replied something to the effect of... "I guess not, as long as they spelled all the words right. Sometimes getting one word wrong can really screw up the whole meaning." The interviewer asked if it bothered Jim that someone else was making money off of his words and Jim said "No, what harm could it do."

#20 actor out on loan

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 01:19 AM

this song always reminds me of a macabre carnival, in sounds and images
with distant memories of freak shows, merry go-rounds and long lost loves.



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