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MY TIME WITH JIM IN THE NEXT WORLD


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#41 Encuentro

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 08:13 PM

Michael Hutchence called Jim an asshole when he (Michael) was alive, and it was several years before the Oliver Stone film was released. It was about 1987 or so, when INXS had their first big success in the U.S. The journalist asked Hutchence what he thought about some people comparing him to Jim Morrison, saying he was the sexiest frontman to come along since Jim Morrison. Hutchence claimed that Morrison was not an influence and dismissed him as an "asshole."

I did a search and couldn't find any such statements from Hutchence. Do you happen to know the publication? No offense, but I need to see the quote myself before I believe it. I've done a fair amount of reading on Hutchence and have never read any statements he has made about Jim.

Edited by Encuentro, 03 September 2013 - 08:14 PM.


#42 Just Another Dark Witness

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 09:17 PM

When I get to hang with Jim in the afterlife, I'm going to drive him around L.A. (virtually, of course...), and crank up L.A. Woman. I wanna get his reaction. Maybe he'll turn it up louder and say "Man, that was a GOOD one, wasn't it?" Then he'll probably say "Why didn't they ever release Paris Blues? You mean the tape got erased? No way!"
Yep, that's what we're gonna do. Then we'll get some beer, go back to my heavenly place, and watch an old Seinfeld and chill. Oh, and we'll make prank calls to Ray.
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#43 Encuentro

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 10:51 PM

Was that a quote from Jacqueline Murray channeling Michael H.? Is that where that came from?

When I was in a video store back in .....umm..around 1999 , up on the screen was this band INXS. I believe it was the first time I had seen them performing. And as I was watching Michael, I was reminded of Jim in the way Michael was walking and the way he started to sing. So, maybe this was in the beginning because watching them in another video now, Michael apparently has his own style. But I was spell bound watching him in that video store. He certainly had similair moves like Jim.

PBS was doing a pledge drive a few years ago and they were showing the best of Ed Sullivan. And back to back were the Rolling Stones/Doors. And the RS came on first and then after their song it cut right over to the Doors. I was astonished at how amateurish, along with a lack of style Mick appeared in contrast to Jim's performance of LMF. So, there is no comparison and what a great statement Jim made of comparisons. IMO, I don't believe anyone can compared with Jim except possibly Elvis as far as being a natural performer. When I was watching JIm on Ed Sullivan, I felt I was watching someone who had been performing for many years and had honed down his performance to a fine art. Nothing like being the age I am now and going back to watch something from the time I was in my teens for another perspective.

Where were the people who were conducting where people could sit and stand at the Key West Theater when they were doing the conga line? I mean wasn't it so crowded that people could hardly move? Didn't they allow a few extra thousand in breaking the code rules? What a hazard that could have been by throwing out the rules for safety. Oh, Jim could have gotten into a lot more trouble....uhhhh geeezzzz. Where was Jim's body guard...Tony? At concerts people were always getting matches and lighters out and lighting up. Watching stoned people walk around with glazed over eyes. Things could have really gotten out of hand.

Things I probably didn't think about when I was a teenager. Ohhhh ........those were the days.

I couldn't agree more about the different performing styles of Mick and Jim. Mick is totally annoying to watch. He looks completely ridiculous. I'm not sure what anybody ever found appealing about his performances. Another significant difference between Mick and Jim was their integrity. Mick was willing to do anything to succeed including altering the lyrics to Let's Spend the Night Together to appease the conservative Ed Sullivan Show, assuring future appearances on the show whereas Jim and the other Doors were willing to sacrifice the continued exposure that would come with future appearances on the show to maintain their artistic integrity. Art before success.



#44 queenhwy

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 02:53 AM

When I get to hang with Jim in the afterlife, I'm going to drive him around L.A. (virtually, of course...), and crank up L.A. Woman. I wanna get his reaction. Maybe he'll turn it up louder and say "Man, that was a GOOD one, wasn't it?" Then he'll probably say "Why didn't they ever release Paris Blues? You mean the tape got erased? No way!"
Yep, that's what we're gonna do. Then we'll get some beer, go back to my heavenly place, and watch an old Seinfeld and chill. Oh, and we'll make prank calls to Ray.


Always funny JADW! :)
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#45 manhime

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 03:10 PM

When I get to hang with Jim in the afterlife, I'm going to drive him around L.A. (virtually, of course...), and crank up L.A. Woman. I wanna get his reaction. Maybe he'll turn it up louder and say "Man, that was a GOOD one, wasn't it?" Then he'll probably say "Why didn't they ever release Paris Blues? You mean the tape got erased? No way!"
Yep, that's what we're gonna do. Then we'll get some beer, go back to my heavenly place, and watch an old Seinfeld and chill. Oh, and we'll make prank calls to Ray.


I Never heard Paris Blues until you mentioned it. Thank You

Just when you thought you heard all the RARE stuff from the doors. Something else pops up

You said the Master was erased? Then where did the people at Youtube get it from?

Why couldn't The doors release it from the same place where the youtube people got it?

Any other rare stuff you can recommend?

Thanks again

#46 queenhwy

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 04:20 PM

I Never heard Paris Blues until you mentioned it. Thank You

Just when you thought you heard all the RARE stuff from the doors. Something else pops up

You said the Master was erased? Then where did the people at Youtube get it from?

Why couldn't The doors release it from the same place where the youtube people got it?

Any other rare stuff you can recommend?

Thanks again


I have that song, but it's listed as Queen of the Magazines, so I didn't even know it was Paris Blues. I'll have to change it in my computer. I'm a bad Doors fan! :(
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#47 Texasky

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 05:33 PM

I couldn't agree more about the different performing styles of Mick and Jim. Mick is totally annoying to watch. He looks completely ridiculous. I'm not sure what anybody ever found appealing about his performances. Another significant difference between Mick and Jim was their integrity. Mick was willing to do anything to succeed including altering the lyrics to Let's Spend the Night Together to appease the conservative Ed Sullivan Show, assuring future appearances on the show whereas Jim and the other Doors were willing to sacrifice the continued exposure that would come with future appearances on the show to maintain their artistic integrity. Art before success.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tjs3utYrSY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGaV2A6o0IM


Exactly, it is all right there. Mick sold out.

Jim is a seasoned pro, where as Mick seems to feel his effeminate waves and moves make him a good performer. Notice that Mick also has a lisp when he sings.

Edited by Texasky, 05 September 2013 - 01:17 AM.

HE COURTED DEATH LIKE IT WAS A DARK ELUSIVE SWEETHEART

#48 Encuentro

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 06:22 PM

I have that song, but it's listed as Queen of the Magazines, so I didn't even know it was Paris Blues. I'll have to change it in my computer. I'm a bad Doors fan! :(

It is Queen of the Magazines. Paris Blues has never been heard by the public. What has been labeled Paris Blues on Youtube is actually Queen of the Magazines. Ray said that his son Pablo partially erased the only known copy of Paris Blues.

Edited by Encuentro, 04 September 2013 - 06:25 PM.


#49 queenhwy

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 06:25 PM

It is Queen of the Magazines. Paris Blues has never been heard by the public. What has been labeled Paris Blues on Youtube is actually Queen of the Magazines. Ray said that his Pablo partially erased the only known copy.


Thanks! I wasn't quite sure. I had read different things over the years. :)
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#50 Shelby68

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 06:31 PM

I did a search and couldn't find any such statements from Hutchence. Do you happen to know the publication? No offense, but I need to see the quote myself before I believe it. I've done a fair amount of reading on Hutchence and have never read any statements he has made about Jim.


I've been trying to remember which magazine it was - and child, this was back in the days of hard copy magazines, so it may not be online. Let's see... Creem magazine was my bible, but I seem to think this Hutchence interview was in a Brit magazine I liked called Smash Hits. It was supposedly a teeny bop mag, but it was so well written and funny. Still, I don't think they printed naughty words like "asshole" in a teen mag, so maybe it was Creem.

And this was a loooonnnng time ago - Hutchence was dating Terri Nunn of Berlin, that gives you an idea of how very long ago.

#51 the_manassa_mauler_1919-'26

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 08:36 PM

I couldn't agree more about the different performing styles of Mick and Jim. Mick is totally annoying to watch. He looks completely ridiculous. I'm not sure what anybody ever found appealing about his performances. Another significant difference between Mick and Jim was their integrity. Mick was willing to do anything to succeed including altering the lyrics to Let's Spend the Night Together to appease the conservative Ed Sullivan Show, assuring future appearances on the show whereas Jim and the other Doors were willing to sacrifice the continued exposure that would come with future appearances on the show to maintain their artistic integrity. Art before success.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tjs3utYrSY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGaV2A6o0IM


in fairness to jagger, the stones predated the doors on sullivan by 3 1/2 years, thats a long period in popular culture time. for them, there was a history there & a certain indebtness the band had to sullivan & the era they sprang from. the doors on the other hand had the luxury to ignore such loyalty or sentiment.

if the stones had done what the doors had done on sullivan in '64 they wouldve taken on much more risk & may have seriously derailed their career. by late '67, the doors had options. they could call their own shots on sullivan, spit in his eye & move on to the changing landscape of cultural mores, lucrative live performances, fm radio & a public wh/ was more forgiving. the same couldnt be said in '64. sullivan & cbs wouldve & couldve punitively damaged their careers profoundly.

furthermore, the stones were brits not playing on their own home turf. it wouldve been more risky & brazen to pull such a move in nyc as oppossed to london.

bottomline, the stones came up in a time when sullivan was more important then he would be by late '67. they had an indebted loyalty to grant to sullivan's wishes, considering his show helped make them a rock institution in the states.

finally in re to style contrast, it had a lot to do w/ region & time period. the stones came up 3-4 yrs before the doors in a nation wh/ in many ways was trying to emulate the states. england also has a long history of cabaret influence wh/ finds its way to stage (think early bowie or floyd as examples). mick may have loved the blues & found his ability to compose thru that vein, but his stage performances were much more influenced by r&b & brit sentiment, then down & dirty blues stage presence. if anybody of the 1st brit invasion could lay claim to that it wouldve been eric burdon, not jagger, lennon/mccartney, daltry or davies.

jim developed his persona in a cali scene at a time when a more raw honest approach was being attempted, not to mention the advent & influence of psychedlic drugs in wh/ the stones werent around early on. the industry was also expanding when the doors hit & had more room for jim's singular exploration.

if you had to point to anyone that influenced jim's style (aside from his own carved out creation), imo it was the early swagger of presley, the cool confidence of sinatra, the distance of arthur lee, the relaxation of voice of dean martin, the surliness of burdon & the command of character from the impressionist american actors like brando or dean.

Edited by the_manassa_mauler_1919-'26, 04 September 2013 - 09:00 PM.


#52 Encuentro

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 09:39 PM

in fairness to jagger, the stones predated the doors on sullivan by 3 1/2 years, thats a long period in popular culture time. for them, there was a history there & a certain indebtness the band had to sullivan & the era they sprang from. the doors on the other hand had the luxury to ignore such loyalty or sentiment.

if the stones had done what the doors had done on sullivan in '64 they wouldve taken on much more risk & may have seriously derailed their career. by late '67, the doors had options. they could call their own shots on sullivan, spit in his eye & move on to the changing landscape of cultural mores, lucrative live performances, fm radio & a public wh/ was more forgiving. the same couldnt be said in '64. sullivan & cbs wouldve & couldve punitively damaged their careers profoundly.

furthermore, the stones were brits not playing on their own home turf. it wouldve been more risky & brazen to pull such a move in nyc as oppossed to london.

bottomline, the stones came up in a time when sullivan was more important then he would be by late '67. they had an indebted loyalty to grant to sullivan's wishes, considering his show helped make them a rock institution in the states.

finally in re to style contrast, it had a lot to do w/ region & time period. the stones came up 3-4 yrs before the doors in a nation wh/ in many ways was trying to emulate the states. england also has a long history of cabaret influence wh/ finds its way to stage (think early bowie or floyd as examples). mick may have loved the blues & found his ability to compose thru that vein, but his stage performances were much more influenced by r&b & brit sentiment, then down & dirty blues stage presence. if anybody of the 1st brit invasion could lay claim to that it wouldve been eric burdon, not jagger, lennon/mccartney, daltry or davies.

jim developed his persona in a cali scene at a time when a more raw honest approach was being attempted, not to mention the advent & influence of psychedlic drugs in wh/ the stones werent around early on. the industry was also expanding when the doors hit & had more room for jim's singular exploration.

if you had to point to anyone that influenced jim's style (aside from his own carved out creation), imo it was the early swagger of presley, the cool confidence of sinatra, the distance of arthur lee, the relaxation of voice of dean martin, the surliness of burdon & the command of character from the impressionist american actors like brando or dean.

Good points. However, while The Stones may have felt indebted to Sullivan for their success the U.S., the performance in which they changed the line from "Let's spend the night together" to "Let's spend some time together" took place on January 15, 1967. Perhaps, they felt that they owed Sullivan a debt for the numerous times they were booked on the show or perhaps they didn't want to burn that bridge seeing it as essential for their continued success. Either way, they weren't up and comers by '67. They were full-fledged rock stars. If they chose to do so, they could have challenged The Ed Sullivan Show on their request to change the line, broken with Sullivan if it came to that and continued to be full-fledged rock stars with one less vehicle, albeit it a prominent vehicle, to promote their singles. It seems to me that The Stones weren't willing to settle for anything less than the absolute pinnacle of commercial success even if it meant compromising their art.

#53 manhime

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 11:27 PM

Jim seemed so NATURAL. Mick seems so jerky. Like someone is zapping him with a shock.

#54 queenhwy

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 02:29 AM

Jim seemed so NATURAL. Mick seems so jerky. Like someone is zapping him with a shock.


Mick Jagger seemed all over the place, but I find him interesting to watch. I've never seen The Doors or Stones live, so I have to base it on concert footage. Mick had an energy, like a kid with ADHD that couldn't sit still. There is some concert footage I've seen when JM looks on fire, absolutely amazing to watch, other times he seems bored. The concert footage from Feast of Friends looked amazing, Jim writhing on the floor and then jumping up, but I've don't know if there is more footage. I've only seen snippet clips.

Anyone can let me know where to find/ buy good Doors concert footage. I used to own on VHS Live in Europe, and I have the Bowl, and PBS Soundstage. Plus, I've seen tons on YouTube, but I didn't know if there was anything I was missing!
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#55 Shelby68

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 02:20 PM

More of the Michael Hutchence interview started coming to me as I was driving home last night - isn't it odd how the mind works. I can remember an interview with a pop star from the 80s but i can't remember the cell phone number that I've had for over 5 years now. Sigh.

A very minor scandal had come out at the time that Michael had an affair with a 16-year old girl. He didn't deny it, but rather commented that "most musicians are not good people" - not people to admire. This was post-Live Aid and We Are the World, but musicians were still kind of portraying themselves as... not paragons of virtue exactly, but certainly more socially conscious. People like Sting, U2 and Bruce Springsteen were the norm. There were a lot of pro-Amnesty International, anti-drug and anti-apartheid benefits going on. Nothing wrong with that, but I thought it was honest for Michael to kind of say: look, most of us are in this for ourselves really [that is a paraphrase, not a direct quote]. Isn't it ironic though that Jim had said a similar thing many years before that "artists are just pursuing their own fantasies" and he downplayed any sort of altruistic or social responsibility.

The exact quote as I remember it when asked about Jim Morrison and his possible influence was "the guy was an asshole." Most young artists do not like being compared to other artists, they want to be thought of as original.

#56 Texasky

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 02:56 PM

I grew up with the Rolling Stones and I started buying their albums in 1964. I ate up their bluesy music. I just thought they were supurb bringing Southern and Chicago blues to the forefront and turning on my generation. My older brother had long been playing blues but here was this English band that could be heard over the air waves all over AM radio. Until the RS came along, there wasn't anything on commercial AM radio like them. The Beatles were also all over the air waves but they were not doing traditional blues songs. If you ever hear them in their early days doing Little Red Rooster. I'm A King Bee, That's How Strong My Love Is, Baby Please Don't Go, You Got To Move, Can't Be Satisfied, just to name a few, they really command attention. You can listen to them right here doing blues:



But over time, and by the mid 70's to 80's they were doing poorly by putting out an album called Black and Blue. I just tried to find it with the cover of the girl tied up and black and blue marks all over her body but it isn't coming up. There were other cuts like Bitch, When The Whip Comes Down, Tie you Up, Too Much Blood, Pretty Beat Up. This was highly offensible and harmful to anyone thinking this was "cool". Especially to young kids who didn't know any better. And their music in my opinion was really bad. My feeling was RIP. They were really falling apart musically imo.

They have since come back and done much better music and in fact, I saw the Steel Wheels tour and bought the album. I also have it on video and I very much enjoy watching it.

I feel that when Brian Jones left the band they just were not as prolific as least blues wise. And I like Brian's contribution so much that I have the album The Pipes of Pan At Jajouka in Morocco that he recorded in 1968.

.....Maybe Mick has been treated for ADDH...or maybe since he is turing 70 he is slowing down some. Mick and Jim were both born in 1943, the year of the water goat.

Edited by Texasky, 05 September 2013 - 03:01 PM.

HE COURTED DEATH LIKE IT WAS A DARK ELUSIVE SWEETHEART

#57 Shelby68

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 03:41 PM

But over time, and by the mid 70's to 80's they were doing poorly by putting out an album called Black and Blue. I just tried to find it with the cover of the girl tied up and black and blue marks all over her body but it isn't coming up. There were other cuts like Bitch, When The Whip Comes Down, Tie you Up, Too Much Blood, Pretty Beat Up. This was highly offensible and harmful to anyone thinking this was "cool". Especially to young kids who didn't know any better. And their music in my opinion was really bad. My feeling was RIP. They were really falling apart musically imo.


That highly offensive cover was withdrawn and changed to close-ups of the band's faces. Unfortunately, there was always a misogynistic element to the Stones, as far back as "Under My Thumb" and "Brown Sugar" (the latter manages to be racist AND sexist). Their music is absolutely brilliant though. Must be in cahoots with the devil or something...

They're an amazing live band too, and I saw them in their later years, 1998 to mid-2000s. I haven't seen them on their most recent tour - too expensive.

#58 Texasky

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 04:57 PM

That highly offensive cover was withdrawn and changed to close-ups of the band's faces. Unfortunately, there was always a misogynistic element to the Stones, as far back as "Under My Thumb" and "Brown Sugar" (the latter manages to be racist AND sexist). Their music is absolutely brilliant though. Must be in cahoots with the devil or something...

They're an amazing live band too, and I saw them in their later years, 1998 to mid-2000s. I haven't seen them on their most recent tour - too expensive.


Yes, do you remember Look At That Stupid Girl from the 60's? It was intertwined along with some good blues music. Strange.

Well, I do hope Jerry Hall had something to do with pulling Mick out of the abyss he had fallen into. Jerry wasn't into drugs and I feel that helped Mick come out of some of that misogynist state of mind from his frist marriage to Bianca which brought even more of those feelings that went into the songs. I also lived in Mesquite as a child (where Jerry grew up) and I remember her older sisters when I kept my horse at Samuel Langley's stable in Mesquite. Those girls were down to earth and friendly, but they were tough. Jerry's father was a truck driver and Mesquite was known for it's rednecks. She had to be tough as leather to hang in there through all of the ups and downs.

But Jerry put up with so much to be with Mick....even after 20 something years and 4 children, he still ran around on her. She finally left.

The Rolling Stones music is indeed outstanding. Like the Phoenix rising from the ashes they came back and made some of the best music around.

Blues, the Devil's music.

Edited by Texasky, 05 September 2013 - 10:46 PM.

HE COURTED DEATH LIKE IT WAS A DARK ELUSIVE SWEETHEART

#59 Shelby68

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 05:22 PM

Or we can go along with what Mavis Staples says, "The devil doesn't have any music!" He's all negativity and destruction, whereas God is creativity and light - so all music is God music. Except for Miley Cyrus, of course.

Rolling Stones songs can pull me out of depression when nothing else will. I think there is so much of the life force embedded in their music somehow that it can breathe life back into you when you're really low.

OT: Tex, did you ever hear that Jerry Hall's dad used to beat her mother? None of our business of course, but it would go some way to explaining why she put up with Mick's ill treatment of her.

#60 flashing bliss

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 05:34 PM

Don't know the Stones in any great depth but one of my favourite songs is Get Off My Cloud. Tell me anyone. Did they ever do another song in that mode? If not, perhaps it was just chart fodder like HILY. Pity because I love the way they did that one.

If I ever get the urge for blues, I can find some Robert Johnson or BB King. Dusty Springfield is much admired over here, but most of her heyday she was simply promoting black music from the US, probably not as well as the people she admired.

I digress. Wasn't Brian Jones known for being heavy handed with his many female admirers? I love the Stone's 60s hits but looking back, it's a bit sad that they had to resort to mysogeny for their image in the 70s.

Hey! Don't blame me ;) This thread had already gone off topic
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